Rajasthani Folk Dance Udaipur Rajasthan India

Rajasthani Dance

The dances of Rajasthan are so inviting and engaging that they are bound to induce you to tap a foot or two along with the dancers. Rajasthani dances are essentially folk dances tracing their origin to rural customs and traditions. What is more interesting is that keeping alive the numerous dance forms are not the professional dancers but the ordinary rural men and women of Rajasthan. The dancers practicing these dance forms are, till date, religiously following the age old traditions and that’s where, the beauty of these dances lies. Apart from the simple expressions and daring movements that add beauty to the dances, there are the vibrant and colorful costumes adorned by the dancers. For the dancers of Rajasthan, the Thar Desert is the centre stage which enhances the beauty of the dances at the backdrop of the setting sun. Some of the folk dances of Rajasthan are illustrated herein.


Kalbelia Dance

This ancient dance form is performed by women of the Kalbelia community who, by profession, are snake charmers and trade in snake venom. This ancient dance form has dance movements similar to the movements of the serpents and hence, even the costumes are black colored. Interestingly, women dance on the music produced by the ‘Been’, an instrument used to charm the snakes. This is an extremely sensuous dance form which completely enthralls the onlookers.

The women of this community are expert in singing and dancing. In olden times the women use to sing and dance only on special occasions such as weddings, festivals etc. in their very own distinct style. As times changed these women started performing stage shows around the whole world and with it changed their dancing style as well as their attires. Their swaying dresses, made up of colourful beads give a distinct identity to the women of Kalbeliya community. What makes this attractive dress more interesting is that it is made by the Kalbeliya women themselves. A very interesting fact about them is that they never teach the folk arts to their children.

They gain expertise in singing and dancing by watching the elders doing it at home.Kalbelia or Kabeliya is one of the most sensuous dance forms of Rajasthan, performed by a tribe of the same name.They are famous for their dance which is an integral part of their culture. Both men and women in the tribe participate in this activity to celebrate joyful occasions.
The Kalbelias were known for their frequent movement from one place to another in ancient times. Their main occupation is catching snakes and trading snake venom.

Hence, the dance movements and the costumes of their community bear a resemblance to that of the serpents. They are also known as Sapera, Jogira or Jogi. They follow Hinduism. They trace their ancestry from Kanlipar, the 12th disciple of Guru Gorakhnath. The largest number of the population of Kalbelias is in Pali district, then Ajmer, Chittorgarh and Udaipur district. They live a nomadic life and have belonged as members of the untouchable caste, shunned by mainstream society.

Traditionally, Kalbelia men carried cobras in cane baskets from door to door in villages while their women sang and danced and begged for alms. They revere the cobra and advocate non-killing of the reptile. In the villages, if a snake inadvertently entered a home, then a Kalbelia would be summoned to catch the serpent and to take it away without killing it. Kalbelias have traditionally been a fringe group in society living in spaces outside the village where they reside in makeshift camps called deras. The Kalbelias move their deras from one place to another in a circuitous route repeated over time. Over the generations, the Kalbelias acquired a unique understanding of the local flora and fauna, and are aware of herbal remedies for various diseases which is an alternative source of income for them.

Since the enactment of the Wildlife Act of 1972, the Kalbelias have been pushed out of their traditional profession of snake handling. Today, performing arts are a major source of income for them and these have received widespread recognition within and outside India. However, performance opportunities are sporadic and since the whole community is not involved in it on a regular basis, many members of the community work in the fields, or graze cattle to sustain themselves.

Kalbelia Dance

The Kalbelia dance, performed to celebrate any joyful moment in the community, is an integral part of Kalbelia culture. Their dances and songs are a matter of pride and a marker of identity for the Kalbelias and they represent the creative adaptation of this community of snake charmers to changing socioeconomic conditions and their own role in rural Rajasthani society.

The dancers are women in flowing black skirts who dance and swirl, replicating the movements of a serpent. The upper body cloth is called Angrakhi and a piece of cloth worn on head known as Odhani similarly the lower body cloth is called Lengha. All these cloths are mixed in red and black hues and embroidered in such a way that when these dancers perform these clothes represent a combination of colours soothing to eyes as well as to the atmosphere.

The male participants take care of the musical part of the dance. They use the different instruments such as the pungi, a woodwind instrument traditionally played to capture snakes, the dufli, been, the khanjari – a percussion instrument, morchang, khuralio and the dholak to create the rhythm on which the dancers perform. The dancers are tattooed in traditional designs and wear jewelry and garments richly embroidered with small mirrors and silver thread. As the performance progresses, the rhythm becomes faster and faster and so does the dance.

Kalbelia songs are based on stories taken from folklore and mythology and special dances are performed during Holi. The Kalbelia have a reputation for composing lyrics spontaneously and improvising songs during performances. These songs and dances are part of an oral tradition that is handed down generations and for which there are neither texts nor training manuals. In 2010, the Kalbelia folk songs and dances of Rajasthan were declared a part of its Intangible Heritage List by the UNESCO.

About Rajasthan enhances your knowledge of Rajasthan folk dances. People of Rajasthan perform Rajasthan dances to express their emotions. These folk dances of Rajasthan display the rich culture and heritage of the land.

The Kalbeliya are known for their ability to enamor snakes and their enchanting Sapera dance. The Kalbeliya folk dance of Rajasthan is performed by women. This dance form is considered as one of the most sensuous dance style, which is performed by Kalbeliya tribe. The snake dancers while performing the dance wear long black-colored shirts with silver embroidery. While performing Kalbeliya folk dance, they sway their bodies like a snake. The snake dancers leave audiences spellbound with their exotic dance performance.

The Sapera dance performed in black costumes is to conjure the goddess Kali, which is their patron deity. The Sapera performers gracefully perform the dance with hand mudras and acrobatically twisting their bodies. With the pumping up of beats, the dancers enliven the whole ambience and captivate the heart and soul of every viewer.

The Kalbiya are snake charmers and dancers.

Kalbeliya Dance the dance of Rajasthan

Rajasthan’s Kalbeliya DanceThe Kalbeliyas, is a snake-charmer community from Rajasthan, which performs the Kalbeliya dance. They rely heavily on this dance performance for their living. The Kalbeliya women dancers wear long, black coloured, drindled-skirts heavily worked with embroidery and light-coloured thread along with small pieces of mirrors. This costume draws the attention in a somewhat strange way.

Kalbeliya is one of the opulent dance forms of Rajasthan. It is performed by the snake charmers community. Kal means snake and beliya means friend. Snakes are really friendly to them and one cannot see any fear in the people belonging to this community regarding snake catching. They are expert in catching all types of snakes,

removing the poison from the snakes, removing the skin , carrying them on their shoulders. These are all daily routine jobs for them. At the time of wedding along with the other items snake is one of the important gift items which is given as a souvenir. No marriage is complete without it.

Rajasthan’s Kalbeliya DanceFemale folks of this community are excellent at performing the dance. Their flexible bodies are compared to the sleek and flexible bodies of snakes. As the snakes don’t have any bones in them and this is what makes them so flexible in their movements so are the movements of the kalbeliyans. They are too excellent in their performances. Spinning around is the main act which they do with all their flexibilities and their speed works on the beats.

The dance costume is very attractive. They wear long black skirts decorated with silver ribbons or gota (local language word for the silver ribbon), danglers, bead strings, traditional bangles. . They dance with their wale covering their face but then also the dancers please the viewers with all their movements. ”

The dance is usually performed by a group of two women standing in the center of the stage. After this pair, another pair of women Rajasthan’s Kalbeliya Dancecome & dances in the same way. As the women dancers move in a circle, while dancing, their body sway acrobatically, leaving an impression that they are made up of some flexible material like rubber. The beat of the dance increases in tempo and also there is an increase in their pace of the dance. This dance performance leaves viewer as exhausted as the dancer. The overall performance consists of many fearful actions performed by dancers. The performance relies heavily to the music of `been` and `duff`. The actual fun of their performance can be enjoyed at the gatherings somewhere around the festival of Holi.

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Ghoomar Dance -

Ghoomar in India-cultural-desert-bhilfolkdance-video-rajasthan-india

Traditional Ritual in Rajasthani People/

The Ghoomar dance is the characteristic dance of the Bhils and a community dance of the Rajputs, also which only the women traditionally perform. It is considered as one of the traditional rituals among this community. So, on the occasion of marriage, a bride is expected to dance Ghoomar after being welcomed at her husband’s home.

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Ghoomar is a very simple dance where the dancers move gently and gracefully in circles. They move about clapping and singing, while tempo of the dance is accelerated. The dance continues for hours into the night.

In Haryana, the songs rendered are high-pitched and rich in humor and satire, while in Rajasthan, Ghoomar is performed to the songs of valor and victory.

As one of the traditional rituals, a bride is expected to dance Ghoomar on being welcomed to her husband’s home.
The word ‘Ghoomar’ is derived form ‘Ghoomna’, the graceful gyrating, which displays the spectacular colours of the flowing ‘ghaghra’, the long skirt of the Rajasthani women.

Ghoomar Dance , Rajasthan
Rajasthan’s Ghoomar DanceThe Ghoomar dance is a very famous and a community dance of women in Rajasthan. It is performed on various auspicious occasions like fairs & festivals. It is called as `Ghoomar`, from the `ghoomna` of Ghaghra i.e. the flowing of Ghaghra, a long skirt of the Rajasthani women. There is an amazing grace as the skirt flair slowly while the women folk twirl in circles, their faces covered with the help of the veil. The performers in Ghoomar dance sway their colorful ghagras that are rich in embroidery work and it is also embellished with mirror-work.

The Ghoomar dance is the characteristic dance of the Bhils and a community dance of the Rajputs, also which only the women traditionally perform. It is considered as one of the traditional rituals among this community. So, on the occasion of marriage, a bride is expected to dance Ghoomar after being welcomed at her husband`s home.

The ochre expanse of the Thar Desert of Rajasthan comes alive with the visual relief of its brightly dressed inhabitants; and when its dancers take the center stage, you just cannot stop tapping your feet. The Ghoomar Dance Rajasthan is one of the most popular folk dances in Rajasthan.

Rajasthan’s Ghoomar DanceThe performing arts of Rajasthan are in fact very rich in their traditional background and speak of a race that have passed through stages tribal primitiveness to move on to a valiant feudalism triggered by the rise of the Rajputs as a class of royalty.

Rajasthan has great variety of dances, which are simple rustic expressions of celebration and festivity. The dancers, with their vibrantly colored costumes have make Thar the most colorful desert in the world with each region adding on to the tradition, its own form of dance styles and performers.

The dances of Rajasthan trace religious traditions, royal legends and myths, while some other are performed with the simple idea of celebrating a particular festivity or fair.

The popular Ghoomar Dance in Rajasthan India is the characteristic dance of the Bhil tribe. However, it is largely associated with the royal ladies of Jaipur, who perform it on certain auspicious occasions. The Kachhwaha Clan of Rajputs who ruled Jaipur, defeated the Bhils and later acceded to a peaceful coexistence. It is therefore normal that the royalty would pick up some of the Bhil traditions and practices. The Ghoomar dance is a essentially a women’s dance performed by the women for exclusively ladies’ gatherings. The women performing the Ghoomar Dance Rajasthan dance in circles.

Rajasthan’s Ghoomar Dance They are dressed in the traditional ghaghra and choli with chunaris. They deck up in traditional silver jewelry and glass bangles. The Ghoomar is performed during women’s gatherings like the ritual of haldi during a wedding, or to entertain a queen in her personal quarters, etc.

The Bhils were an indomitable war-like tribal race. Initially they made the highways and roads a dangerous place for Jaipur’s traders and commoners. Whenever the Kachhwahas tried to discipline them, they simply disappeared into the nooks and corners of the Aravallis which have been their home for centuries. Realizing the futility of this exercise, the Kachhwahas sued for peace and exempted the Bhils were from paying tribute which was however, not a very big deal since the Bhils were most unlikely to pay. In any case, after this incident, the Kachhwahas accepted the Bhils as friends of the royalty.

Women from any age group, may it be the young or old can participate in Ghoomar dance. There are simple swaying movements with special kind of footwork, to convey the spirit of any auspicious occasion. Sometimes this dance may continue for hours or the whole night. While dancing, the dancers move in a circular direction with clockwise and anti-clockwise steps. The performers sometimes unite their hands and even clap their hand in-between. The performers move gracefully on the beat of the songs in synchronizing steps. As the tempo of the dance increases, the dancers swirl fleetly.
Ghoomar is a traditional folk dance of Rajasthan, India and southern Asia. which was developed by the Bhil tribe and was adopted by other Rajasthani communities. It is performed by groups of women in swirling robes, and accompanied by men and women singing together.

This folk dance gets its name from ‘ghoomna’, the pirouetting which displays the spectacular colors of the flowing ‘ghaghara’, the long skirt of the Rajasthani women. There is an amazing grace as the skirt flair slowly while the women folk twirl in circles, their faces covered with the help of the veil. Their measured steps and various graceful inclinations of body, beating palms or snapping fingers at particular cadences while singing some lilting songs.

The Ghoomar dance is a very famous and a community dance of women in Rajasthan. It is performed on various auspicious occasions like fairs & festivals. It is called as `Ghoomar`, from the `ghoomna` of Ghaghra i.e. the flowing of Ghaghra, a long skirt of the Rajasthani women. There is an amazing grace as the skirt flair slowly while the women folk twirl in circles, their faces covered with the help of the veil. The performers in Ghoomar dance sway their colorful ghagras that are rich in embroidery work and it is also embellished with mirror-work.

Description :

The Ghoomar dance is the characteristic dance of the Bhils and a community dance of the Rajputs, also which only the women traditionally perform. It is considered as one of the traditional rituals among this community. So, on the occasion of marriage, a bride is expected to dance Ghoomar after being welcomed at her husband`s home.

The ochre expanse of the Thar Desert of Rajasthan comes alive with the visual relief of its brightly dressed inhabitants; and when its dancers take the center stage, you just cannot stop tapping your feet. The Ghoomar Dance Rajasthan is one of the most popular folk dances in Rajasthan.

The performing arts of Rajasthan are in fact very rich in their traditional background and speak of a race that have passed through stages tribal primitiveness to move on to a valiant feudalism triggered by the rise of the Rajputs as a class of royalty.

Rajasthan has great variety of dances, which are simple rustic expressions of celebration and festivity. The dancers, with their vibrantly colored costumes have make Thar the most colorful desert in the world with each region adding on to the tradition, its own form of dance styles and performers.

The popular Ghoomar Dance in Rajasthan India is the characteristic dance of the Bhil tribe. However, it is largely associated with the royal ladies of Jaipur, who perform it on certain auspicious occasions. The Kachhwaha Clan of Rajputs who ruled Jaipur, defeated the Bhils and later acceded to a peaceful coexistence. It is therefore normal that the royalty would pick up some of the Bhil traditions and practices. The Ghoomar dance is a essentially a women”s dance performed by the women for exclusively ladies” gatherings. The women performing the Ghoomar Dance Rajasthan dance in circles.

They are dressed in the traditional ghaghra and choli with chunaris. They deck up in traditional silver jewelry and glass bangles. The Ghoomar is performed during women”s gatherings like the ritual of haldi during a wedding, or to entertain a queen in her personal quarters, etc.

The Bhils were an indomitable war-like tribal race. Initially they made the highways and roads a dangerous place for Jaipur”s traders and commoners. Whenever the Kachhwahas tried to discipline them, they simply disappeared into the nooks and corners of the Aravallis which have been their home for centuries. Realizing the futility of this exercise, the Kachhwahas sued for peace and exempted the Bhils were from paying tribute which was however, not a very big deal since the Bhils were most unlikely to pay. In any case, after this incident, the Kachhwahas accepted the Bhils as friends of the royalty.

Women from any age group, may it be the young or old can participate in Ghoomar dance. There are simple swaying movements with special kind of footwork, to convey the spirit of any auspicious occasion. Sometimes this dance may continue for hours or the whole night. While dancing, the dancers move in a circular direction with clockwise and anti-clockwise steps. The performers sometimes unite their hands and even clap their hand in-between. The performers move gracefully on the beat of the songs in synchronizing steps. As the tempo of the dance increases, the dancers swirl fleetly.

Women performing ghoomar dance at a wedding corporate event,annual function,anniversary Party,lanuch promotion and mahila ladies sangeet in Rajasthan India.

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culture of rajasthan, dances in rajasthan, fairs in rajasthan, famous dance of rajasthan, festivals in rajasthan, folk dance of rajasthan, folk rajasthan, ghoomar dance, rajasthan popular dance, rajasthani dance, social folk dance, traditional dance of rajasthan

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paniharin dance

Water is a scare commodity in the parched desert lands of Rajasthan and hence is deemed precious. Women who fetch water from afar are known as the Panihari. These women often come from the socially and economically backward classes of the state and undertake great hardships to bring in water in camel-hide bags from distant wells and oases.

To keep their minds off the labor, these Panihari sang songs. These songs often had water and rains as their theme. The overworked women created melodious numbers that spoke of flowing rivers and the splashing waves. This provided them the emotional and mental strength in their tedious task. Soon Panihari songs became famous and common.

Description :

Panihari slowly came to be a part of the rich folk dance and music culture of this state. Themes too grew to encompass the daily affairs of women and their household chores. The songs sung as the women washed and cleaned and worked around the village well were also classified as Panihari songs.

Women of the hearth and homes sang of their love and disappointment, their unappreciated sacrifices at the altar of mundane domesticity. Humor and mirth too was added to these songs by the womenfolk. They took this opportunity to take a dig at their troublesome mother-in-laws. Panihari was an effective expression of the pent up creativities of the rustic Rajasthani women.

A famous theme of the Panihari songs is the tale of a young, unwed girl who stumbles upon a stranger on her way home from the well. Taking pity upon the parched stranger she offers him some water. After the drink the immodest stranger sings praises of her beauty and follows her home on her camel. Fuming at such outrage the village lass complains to her mother. The lady meets the stranger and laughs at her daughter’s ignorance as the stranger turns out to be the girl’s fiancé.

The mischievous romance, the mock anger and the humor of a happy end are captured well in this song. Panihari songs are not set to any formal or classical note or raaga. They are lilting melodies that spontaneously overflow from a woman’s heart.

Chari Dance -

This traditional dance form requires lots of skill and patience as this dance is performed with pots on the head and lamps in the hand of the dancers. In such a state, the dancers perform several flexible and graceful movements of the body. This dance is performed on gay occasions, like marriage or birth of a child.

Chari Dance is a specialty of Gujjar community of Kishanganj in Rajasthan. It is basically performed by the womenfolk of Rajasthan’s rural area. Kishangarh region has produced the best Chari performers in Rajasthan. This dance started as an expression of joy after the collection of water by women, travelling miles. Also known as the welcome dance it is performed during a marriage or to welcome a newborn child.
Performance Dancers perform gracefully while balancing pots on their heads. The deft foot movements along with hands and swaying motion of the body inspire awe and admiration.

Dancers of Chari quite often carry flaming pots. They are kept lit with cotton seeds soaked in oil. The lighted pots present a stunningly amazing sight especially at night. Except for the balancing act, dance movements here are also rather uncomplicated. The style is almost like ghoomar.

The joy of getting and bringing water to homes in this dry desert area reflects in their dance performance. Dancers are trained from their childhood and only after they master the art of balancing pots are they eligible to balance with lighted pots. They move in the same pattern and sequence along with the flow of music. Lot of patience, balance and skill is required for this dance form.

Chari Dance Elements

Chari Dance is performed with Rajasthani folk music in the background. The music is played with dhol, dholak, nagada and harmonium, also bankiya and thali. The dancers wear traditional Rajasthani clothes in bright colors. The ladies wear big nose rings and other ornaments.
Occasion for Chari Dance

The dance takes place on festive days and on special occasions. The graceful rhythmic movements along with the music keeps the viewers enthralled. The performance mainly takes place to celebrate an occasion like a marriage or birth of a male child.
Women of the Gujjar Community in Kishanganj.

The women of Kishanganj in Rajasthan are the best known Chari performers in the state. They specialize in this particular dance forms which needs a lot of rigorous practice. The dancers needs to acquire the skill of this dance form greatly or else they might have the risk of getting burnt. The diya’s soft glow along with bright colored costumes depicts the combination of softness and vibrancy of the women folk of this region. Chari the pot dance truly brings forth the spirit of Rajasthan, its tradition and culture.

This is a famous dance of females belonging to gujjar community of Kishangarh. These ladies carry brass pots on their heads balancing it to perfection. Often these pots are kept ignited with the cotton seeds dipped in oil. These lit pots display beautiful effect in the dark night.

This dance does not have any particular movements except balancing the pots on their heads. These ladies dance like ghoomar. Instruments played are dhol, bankiya and thali. This dance is a significance of goodness and is known as a welcome dance also.

Gujjar ladies wear big nose rings, on top of their heads they wear khol(define) of coconut. Sampan ladies wear gold ornaments, Hansli, timniya, mogri, punchi, bangdi, gajra, armlets, karli, tanka, navr are the main ornaments.

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Fire Dance -

This is an extremely difficult dance to perform which is carried out by the Banjara community. The dance involves breathtaking fire stunts wherein the dancers perform by holding fire rods in their hands and filling up their mouths with kerosene. The fire rods are also moved on their heads and legs by the dancers.

Fire Dance Celebration

The fire dance is performed in the desert region of Rajasthan on the festive occasions like Holi, Janmashtami etc. This unique dance performance attracts viewers from all over.

Fire Dance

Fire Dance is an enchanting art form, which is popular in the desert regions of Rajasthan. It is a traditional folk dance that depicts the style of living of the Jasnathis belonging to Churu and Bikaner districts of Rajasthan. It is one of the oldest and most difficult dance forms and therefore performed by skilled dancers only. People belonging to Banjara community are usually seen performing this dance.
The dance portrays tantric powers possessed by Jasnathis. Drum beats set the background music as Jasnathi boys and men jump into the fire to drum beats. They perform breathtaking stunts with fire. The dancers hold fire rods in the hand and take sips of kerosene and keep it in their mouths. The stunts performed by the dancers will give you goose bumps. The dancers move the fire rods on their legs and heads as well. The dancers never fear death and they perform with the belief that they are protected by a divine power.

A large ground spread with live charcoal and wood forms the stage for such a dance form. The performance takes place on a huge bed of flaming coal that is considered to be the main attraction of the performance.

History
Origin of the various dance forms of Rajasthan is mainly attributed to rural customs and traditions. Fire dance is performed by a selective section of the population of Rajasthan, namely Banjara community. It has originated with the belief that performers posses tantric powers and while they perform they are protected by a divine power. It is considered to be the most difficult dance form but interestingly, performers never get any blisters due to the fire.
Performance of Fire Dance
Dancers swing to the rhythm of drum beats as the tempo increases gradually. At one point of time it reaches at crescendo. At this moment the dancers are in a trance like state. The large bed of flaming coals on which they dance deserves a special mention.
This dance form presented by Banjara community includes breathtaking stunts. They dance around the fire, while the dancer also has two flamed sticks in hand. He throws the kerosene that he holds in his mouth over the lamps. Dancers reach a near-hypnotic state as the tempo of the drum beats increases. The performances are considered to be devotional. U will be amazed to see how men and women of Rajasthan perform this dance with grandeur and without any fear.


Terah Taal (Thirteen Beat) Dance -

The Terah Taal dance is a beautiful musical dance in which the dancers place manjeeras (little brass discs) on their waist, legs, hands and forehead, at least thirteen places on their body. This dance is performed as a kind of ritual to please Baba Ramdeo, a local deity of Rajasthan.

The Terah Taal is a well known traditional folk dance form in Rajasthan. Performing this dance requires a lot of practice, concentration and skill. It is a very beautiful and impressive dance form, that has attracted flocks of tourists, over the ages. It is mainly performed by members of the Kamada tribe who are skilled snake charmers. The usual set-up consists of Manjeeras, cymbals, or similar discs constructed using metals like bronze, copper, brass or zinc. These instruments are commonly used in various Indian folk music songs or in religious hymns. These Manjeeras make the Terah Taal dance, one of the most enthralling dance forms in Rajasthan. The music of the Ektara is usually played during the Terah Taal Dance performance. Accordingly, the Manjeeras are appropriately tied to thirteen pre-defined parts of the dancer’s body. The sounds produced by these thirteen Manjeeras, form the Terah Taal dance or the thirteen beats. On several occasions, the Terah Taal dance is performed using sharp swords, yielded by the performing dancers. This is the reason that, such a difficult form requires high levels of accuracy, precision and dedication which can be achieved only by professional dancers, who have perfected their skill over years of hard work and perseverance.

History
The Terah Taal Dance has a beautiful set of beats that takes one through the rich and delicate cultural folk traditions of Rajasthan. While touring through the state, one will often come across Terah Taal Dance performances taking place at regular intervals. This adventurous dance form is mainly performed by the Kamada tribe, whose members are also well known snake charmers. The Terah Tall dance is also performed by other various tribes of Rajasthan, namely Mirasi, Bhand, Dholi, Bhat and Nat. The dance form, however, is also an important ritual seen in the famous Baba Ramdev temple located at Runecha.

Performance of Terah Taal Dance

Terah (thirteen) cymbals or Manjeeras are used to give a vibrant feel to the dancer’s immediate movements. They also compliment the musical instruments that are played to the devotional singing from the people. It makes for a delightfully enchanting performance. The order of placing the Manjeeras or cymbals on the body of the performer is nine cymbals on the right leg, seven between the knee and ankle, one on the instep, one on the big toe, and one each on both arms. The performer or performers sit in front of the shrine of the legendary Ramdeoji along with the musicians who are seen playing various musical instruments like ‘chutara’ or ‘khartla’, and begin to sing songs in devotion of the glorified saint.

The dance begins with the musicians chanting in a slow manner while the performer moves the right leg slowly and starts striking the Manjeeras placed in the hands against those tied up at other parts of the body. With the increase in tempo, the performer accordingly stirs into a vibrant motion and produces some amazing patterns

by constantly changing the force and patterns of the strikes and embellishments in a smooth, lively rhythm. The beauty and attraction of this majestic performance lies in the accurate co-ordination between the music and the swift rocking motion of the dancer who, while constantly leaning, inclining and swaying, strikes the moving

cymbals with great accuracy, like a person in a trance. In order to create the desired sounds, the Manjeeras or the metallic discs are made of metals such as bronze, brass, copper and zinc. On several occasions, the dances are also performed using sharp swords as props. The Terah Taal Dance requires a lot of accuracy, precision, dedication and consistency which is why, it can only be pulled off by seasoned or advanced dancers, who regularly participate in this beautiful dance performance.

Terah Taal Dance Elements

The Terah Taal Dance form is performed by members of various tribes like Dholi, Bhand, Bhat and Nat. At places like Chouki Dhani, it is performed on different ways that involve walking on broken glass, dancing on swords, dancing with 7 “Matkas” on the head and so on. This dance is usually performed by three or four dancers using Manjeeras that are metallic discs, made of bronze, copper, zinc or brass. A wire is tied to these discs through a hole present in the centre of each disc. These discs are then placed jointly at different angles at various points. The resulting sound is always an amazing metallic plethora that compliments the heavy vocals and percussions in a fine manner. The variations in the sound and the intensity depends on the person playing the Manjeera.

Occasions For Terah Taal Dance

The Terah Taal dance is usually performed on several occasions. However, it is mainly performed as an act of devotion to please the local deity of Rajasthan, Baba Ramdeo. He lived in the 16th century and was a God for the poor and downtrodden people, or those who belonged to low castes. The dancers sing praises to this saint in memory of his miracles. The government of Rajasthan, in collaboration with several NGOs, is promoting this dance form, in India as well as abroad.
The Kamada Tribe Of Snake Charmers
The Kamada tribe of snake charmers are highly skilled performers of the Terah Taal Dance, and do so, gracefully. The members of the tribe can perform with all their might, even when the Manjeeras are improperly fitted or when dancing on swords. This is due to their devotion for the sacred saint Baba Ramdeo, and his works for the

people.

Terah Taali Dance Rajasthan
Rajasthan’s Terah Tali DancePerformed by the members of the Kamada tribe, Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is one of the ancient performing arts of Rajasthan. Performed with Manjeeras and other metallic instruments, Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is one of the most entertaining dance forms of Rajasthan and attracts tourists from all over. Indianholiday.com gives online information about Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan and other tourist attractions of Rajasthan and other parts of India.

History
Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan in India is one of the beautiful folk dance performances that attract tourists from all over. The Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is performed by the Kamada tribe who are traditional snake charmers. Besides this it is also performed by the tribes of Mirasi, Bhand, Dholi, Bhat and Nat. The Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan however is also an important ritual in the Baba Ramdev temple at Runecha.

Description
Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan is one of the excellent folk dances of Rajasthan. The beats of Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan remind us of Rajasthan’s rich cultural heritage and folk traditions. The Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan generally performed along with Manjeeras and other metallic discs which are made of bronze, brass, copper and zinc.

Rajasthan’s Terah Tali DanceDuring the Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan the music of the Ektara accompanies the dance performance. Manjeeras are tied to thirteen different parts of the parts of the body. The sounds of these Manjeeras produce the Terah Taal or the thirteen beats.

Often during the Terah Taal the dances with swords are also performed. The Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan requires accuracy and precision which can only be done by the professional dancers who participate in this beautiful dance performance. On your tour to Rajasthan, you can get a glimpse of the Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan and attracts tourists from all over.

Terah thirteen cymbals are used to give rhythm to the intricate movements of the performer and to provide a synchronous pulse to the accompanying musical instruments as well as the devotional singing is a bewitching performance. Nine cymbals are fastened on the right leg, seven between the knee and the ankle, one on the instep, one on the big toe, and each on both the arms, while the performer or sometimes two, sit in front the heroon housing the image of the legendary Ramdeoji along with the accompanists playing on chutara and khartla, singing songs in adoration of the saint.

Rajasthan’s Terah Tali DanceTo begin with, the accompainsts chant in slow rhythm and the performer streching the right leg a little, starts striking the cymbals in hands against those tied up at different places. With the increase in the tempo, the performer stirred into rapid lively movement weaves some intriguing patterns by changing the sequence of the strikes and embellishments in the rhythm. The magnificence of this grandiose spectacle lies in the simultaneity of the swift and elegant rocking motion of the performer- leaning, inclining and swaying back and forth of the torso, while striking tinkling cymbals with great precision, as if in a hypnotic trance.

Teratali is a devotional dance form related to the phenomena of Ramdeo”s worship. Ramdeo lived in 16th century and emerged as god for down-trodden and hierarchically low castes. He is worshipped in large tracts of Rajasthan, Punjab, M.P. and Gujrat.

Performed by the members of the Kamada tribe, Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is one of the ancient performing arts of Rajasthan. Performed with Manjeeras and other metallic instruments, Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is one of the most entertaining dance forms of Rajasthan and attracts tourists from all over. gives online information about Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan and other tourist attractions of Rajasthan and other parts of India.

Teratali is a dance form where women tie good number of Manjiras on their body and play them with dexterity with hands. They sing in praise of Ramdeo and his miracles.

The group of Teratali dancers is known as Kamad. The families of the Kamad community of Nagore district have decided not to dance and that has barred many female dancers from performance skills. They continue to sing devotional songs for their patrons.

They presently work as priests of Ramdeo shrines and temples in the villages. They use Tandura or Chautaro as drone and rhythm instruments. Manjira and Tal are their main dance instruments. Dholak provides them with rhythm. The songs are always of devotional nature.

History :

Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan in India is one of the beautiful folk dance performances that attract tourists from all over. The Terah Taal Dance, Rajasthan is performed by the Kamada tribe who are traditional snake charmers. Besides this it is also performed by the tribes of Mirasi, Bhand, Dholi, Bhat and Nat. The Terah Taal Dance in Rajasthan however is also an important ritual in the Baba Ramdev temple at Runecha.

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Chakri Dance-

As the name resembles, Chakri, means ‘Chakkar’ (Circle) rotation in hindi lang. Chakri is one of the most popular folk dance of Kanjar tribe. Kanjar tribe inhabited in some parts of Kota and Baran district of Rajasthan.

Chakri Dance is performed in almost all the marriages and festival in the Haroti region of Rajasthan. Chakri dance is performed exclusively by the womenfolk of Kanjar tribe and it is also their main source of livelihood.

The women of Kanjar Tribe who settled in Baran and Kota district of Rajasthan first gave rise to this dance and soon it became their sole means of running a livelihood. Now it has also migrated to different parts of Rajasthan such as the Haroti, Barod and the Chippa region. Chakri Dance is very similar to a native dance of Madhya Pradesh known as Raai which is mainly performed by the tribe known as the Beriyas.

Performance of Chakri Dance

Although Chakri Dance can technically be performed as a solo act, it is generally performed in groups of immensely skilled women dancers. These women excel in their art of dancing in a way that they actually manifest the confidence to make this dance their only means of earning and making a living out of it. Most of these women come from remote parts of Rajasthan where education rate of the masses is poor. Thanks to Chakri Dance they can rely on this art as a means to earn their livelihood.

Being one of the most famous dances in Rajasthan, dance groups from all over are hired for occasions such as to celebrate the arrival of a groom at the bride’s doorstep, or for pre-wedding Indian ceremonies such as Sangeet. Women performers of this dance have a pretty tight schedule all the year round and manage to make a decent income out of their talent for dancing.

Laden with rainbow-colored outfits, the fact that they are enjoying themselves while dancing is reflected clearly on the faces of the women dancing the Chakri Dance.

Once they begin their dance number, they seem to forget the rest of the world around them and simply lose themselves in their performance. They spin at lightning fast speed and become a blur with their skirts whipping around in the wind during the peak of their performance.

Anyone without the requisite expertise would be unable to perform this brilliantly artistic dance because it needs nothing less than pure perfection. Being performed in and about a pretty large area, the dancers need to be extremely careful not to bang into each other while spinning at such high speed for such accidents could seriously hurt someone. However, with years and years of practice, these women can gracefully and flawlessly perform this dance just like a wheel in motion.

Chakri Dance is an absolute treat for the eyes and people from all over the nation queue up in Rajasthan just to feast their eyes on such a unique dance form that has only gotten better with time.

The Chakri Dance Elements

The Chakri Dance would not have the same fervor or life without the right kind of music. Hence music is the key element of this dance. There are groups of women who prefer singing their own song simultaneously while performing this dance, but such a routine can be quite tiresome. Most of the dancers are hence, accompanied by skillful singers who sing traditional folk songs along with playing the Dholak, Nagara (a type of a drum that issues forth loud music) or other musical instruments as the women work their magic with the dances. The music is always of a fast tempo making it peppy so that even the audiences who come to watch these performances are moved enough to start dancing with the beats of the song.

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Bhavai Dance-

Bhavai is one of the traditional folk dances of Rajasthan. This is a very difficult form of dance and can only be performed by skilled artists. This dance basically involves women dancers balancing 8 to 9 pitchers on their heads and dancing simultaneously. This nail biting , suspenseful dance, the well skilled dancers balance a number of earthen pots or brass picthers and then sway with the soles of their feet perched on the top of a glass and also sometime on the edge of a naked sword or on the rim os a brass thali (plate) during the performance.

One of the traditional and famous dances of Rajasthan is Bhawai Dance. This form of dance is extremely difficult and only the expert artists can perform it. This is a women dance in which women dancers’ dance concurrently balancing eight to nine pitchers on their heads. The super expert dancer’s stabilizes a number of brass pitchers or earthen pots and then swing with under surface of their feet balanced on a glass top or on the perimeter of a brass thali (plate) or even on the bare sword’s edge through the performance in this thrilling and panicky dance.
It is believed that the Bhawai dance was initially invented in the adjoining Gujarat state but was quickly selected to pick and modified it in a characteristic Rajasthani style and essence by local ethnic women and men. Traditionally, this dance of Bhawai is executed by the women folk of Bhil, Meena, Jat, Chamar, Kumbhar, Kalbelia and Raiger groups of Rajasthani communities owing to the amazing ability and qualities of these communities to carry several water pots in one go on their heads from long distances of desert area.

History

The women folks belonging to the Bhil, Meena, Jat, Kumbhar, Kalbelia and Raiger groups of Rajasthani communities traditionally perform this kind of skillful dance. It is supposed that Bhawai type of dances were gradually evolved from the outstanding technique of the women of above mentioned communities while carrying several water pots at one time on their heads from long distances of the desert.

Performance of Bhawai Dance

Rajasthan state’s Bhawai dance form is generally executed by the female dancers balancing from seven to nine brass pitchers on their heads while dancing rapidly and repeatedly moving and spinning with sole of their feet resting on top of a glass or on the sword’s edge.

Bhawai dance form is carried with superb talent with the art of spinning and dancing still maintaining an excellent balancing work and also posing several objects and articles on dancer’s head. The tribes of Rajasthan such as Bhils, Meenas, Kumhars, Jat, Kalbelia and Chamars promoted and enriched this folk dance with passage of time. The tribe of snake charmers, Kalbelia, is specially considered expert in the art of balancing and the female dancers of this tribe perform jovial welcome while holding clay pitchers up to ten on their head.

The female folk of these tribes are habituated to such matching precision owing to their hard work for carrying water in the desert. Rajasthani women folk can easily carry many such types of pots or pitchers in this manner on their heads to fetch water from far away wells to their homes. It is believed that Bhawai dance was originated in Gujarat state but later on quickly selected and modified by the tribal women and men to give this dance a unique essence of Rajasthan.
The dancers not only perform the balancing act on her head pitchers but also ascend on a plate supported by brass tumblers to make dance a super success and exciting the thoughts of onlookers that a small wrongdoing can spoil the whole show. The extra daring dancers can even perform Bhawai dance on a sword or on the broken glass.

Sometimes ready ‘Puja Thali’ (a plate having worshipping materials) can also be balanced by dancer on her head.
In nutshell, Bhawai dance of Rajasthan State is an unambiguous and excitement filled action dance for all ages to watch and to gather its minute artistic details and historical background.

Bhavai Dance Elements

The background music in Bhawai dance is played by the male musicians who are the adjunct of this dance. The extra beauty is added to the dance by singing the melodious folk songs of Rajasthan by musicians during dance performance. Many traditional musical instruments such as Jhanjhar, Dholak, harmonium, sarangi and pakhwaj are played to give musical effects during the performance of Bhawai dance. The dancers and musicians are traditionally and beautifully dressed in colorful Rajasthani dresses to make this dance further attractive.

Occasions for Bhavai Dance

The performances of Bhawai dances can sometimes be seen in marriage functions and on other festive occasions. The necessary measures are strictly being taken by the Government of Rajasthan to revive this fast dying art of traditional dances. Other non Government organizations are also doing their active roles in saving such folk cultures. Due to all these efforts, this artistic Bhawai Dance has been promoted both in different Indian states and abroad also.

Kalbelia Tribe of Snake Charmers

The snake charmers tribe of Rajasthan known as Kalbelia is extremely talented in the ability of balancing act of bhawai dance. The female performers of this tribe can even perform cheerful welcome while balancing up to ten clay pitchers on head. It is supposed that these females of ‘Kalbelia’ are expert in such balancing act due to their lot of outside venturing in the arid desert areas. Such types of pitchers and pots are also carried out by women folks of Rajasthan in same manner to fetch water from far away wells for their homes.

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Gavri Dance-

Gavari dance of Rajasthan is a tribal dance of the famous Bhil tribe. This is mainly a tribal dance drama and is beautifully expressed by its troupe having many different characters. Gawari tribal dance is a running dramatical dance which go from village to village for a month. Its is great entertainment for rural population.

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Mayur Dance

Brajleela Shows

- Vrindavan Is Existed In The Centre Of That Great Land Which Inspire Many Great Saints And Philosophers And Has Also Kalidah The Place Where He Enslaved The King Of Poisonous Snake (Naga) In The Midst Of Kalindi (Yamuna River) Besides Making Each One Of The Thousands Of Gopikas To Think Themselves As Radha.

Live Shows

- From Many Years In All Parts Of India. This Is Cultural Organ Of Mathura In The State Of Up Many Trained And Experienced Artist Of Dramatic Art Presents The Live Shows Of Following

Brij Vandana

- Worshiping Of Brij Bhoomi, Krishna And Radha Through Musical Songs In Brij Bhasha (Spoken In Brij).

Mayur Nritya

- When Radha Ji Wants To See Dance Of Peacock, To Fulfil Her Desire, Lord Krishna Portrays Himself As Peacock And Performs Dance Like Mayur.

Chakra Nritya

- Chakra Nritya Is A Representation Of Lord Vishnu’s Chakra (Sudarshana Chakra) Where A Heavy Brass Plate Is Revolved Only On Index Finger And Thrown 15-20 Feet Above In The Air And Rebalanced Similar To Its Previous State And Same Action Is Repeated Many A Times.

Charkula Nritya

- It Is A Folk Tale Of Uttar Pradesh In India Of Times When Radha (Paramour Of Shri Krishna) Was Born About Five Thousand Years Back In The Village Of Barsana. The People Of That Place Put Many Lamps On The Flat Wheel Of Chariot. Then They Danced With The Chariot Wheel On Their Head. Even Today The Farmers Of The Area Enjoy Similar Tradition Just Before The Harvesting Season. Please Note The Wheel Is Called Charkula In The Local Dialect And It Usually Weighs About 40 Kgs, Hence The Name Of Charkula Dance.

Rasleela/Bhajan Rasiya

- Raslila Is A Famous Art Form Originating In Braj In Uttar Pradesh In North India. This Folk Art Has Elements Of Classical Music, Dace And Drama. Raslila Is Associated With Radha And Krishna And Their Divine Love. It Is A Joyous Circular Dance Of Sri Krishna And His Playmates. Today We Have Villagers In India Taking Part In Raslila And Depicting Various Stories Of Radha And Krishna Through Dance, Music And Drama.

It Also Portrays Krishna’s Association With The Milkmaids Or Gopis Of The Village. It Shows How Krishna Casts A Spell On The Gopis Who Wanted Him To Be Their Dance Partner. Raslila Has A Basic Script Which Has To Be Followed, But It Has Enough Scope For Improvisation As Well. Though The Emphasis Of Raslila Is On ‘Darshan’ Or The Visual Appeal, It Is Important To Capture The ‘Bhava’ Or The Sentiment. This Is Done Through Music, Dance And Drama Enacted By The Actors.

The Various ‘Raasas’ Or Dramatic Flavors Like Friendship, Conjugal Love, Parental Love, Amazement, Compassion, Humour, Chivalry, Fury, Fear And Dread Are Expressed Through This Traditional Folk Form.

Dandiya Ras

- “Dandiya Raas”, Which Is Performed During Navratri. In Fact, It Holds A Significant Place In Navratri Celebrations. It Is Known For Setting The Festive Mood. Dandiya Raas Is The Featured And Most Popular Dance Of Navratri Evenings In Gujarat. The Dance Form Is Not Just Restricted To Gujarat. It Is Performed In Many Other States, During The Festive Season Of Navratri. Dandiya Raas Is Performed In The Honor Of Goddess Durga. Attach Photo

Latthmar Holi

- In Brij, People Enjoy Holi With Danda (A Form Of Bamboo Which Is A Little Bit Short But Very Stout), Colors (Abeer, Gulaal) And With Flowers. This Festival Is Quite Famous And Popular And Played With Great Enthusiasm. The Women Try To Strike Men With These Dandas And The Men Try To Escape And This Goes On As A Play. In Nandgaon And Barsana Holi Is Played With Sweets (Laddoo’s).

Phoolon Ki Holi

- Krishna And Radha Play Holi With Flower Petals. Several Qunitals Of Flower Petals Are Used In This Leela.

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Kachhi-Ghodi Dance -

Kacchi-Ghodi, or the dummy horse dance, originated from the bandit regions of Shekhawati. The dancers are elaborately dressed, and so are the dummy horses, which perform sword fighting sequences with utmost vigor. A ballad singer usually sings the tales of chivalrous men. This dance form is generally performed on gay occasions.

The performing arts of Rajasthan mostly hail from the tribes of Rajasthan and are reflective of the socio historical scenario peculiar to the time or race they depict.

Horses have always been a very important part of warfare and transportation in Rajasthan. The legend of the valiant Rana Pratap Singh goes untold without the mention of his loyal vehicle- Chetak. Horses, as much as they were the symbol of royal power, were also used by the bandits and highwaymen who found it easy to stop people traveling on elephants of bullock carts with their horses.

Kacchi Ghodi of Rajasthan is performed by men on dummy horses. Men wear elaborate costumes embellished with brilliant mirror-work and ride the dummy horses. The dummy horses used as prop are equally adorned with meticulous embroidery and mirrored-work. The dancers ride the dummy horses with swords in their hands. These dancers with swords move to the beats of drums and fifes. In Kacchi Ghodi dance of Rajasthan, a singer narrates the tales of Bavaria bandits of Shekhawati region.Kacchi Ghodi dance of Rajasthan is performed on the bridegroom”s party. On the ballad song, the dancers riding on fake horses uses mock fight to dramatize the scenes of the exploits of the bandit. Brandishing of swords and pirouetting to thebeats of drums holds the attention of viewers. Kacchi Godi of Rajasthan is a famous folk dance full of zest and colors.

Specially, notorious were the bandits of the Shekhawati region, owing mostly to the high concentration of businessmen and traders in that part of Rajasthan. And traders meant money; and traders meant long overnight journeys on caravans laden with expensive wares. The Kachhi Ghodi Dance Rajasthan depicts the confrontation of the bandits of the Bavaria clan of tribes with the passing commoners.

Rajasthan’s kachhi Ghodi DanceThe centuries of history that has piled up behind Rajasthan has resulted, among other things, in the accumulation of a very rich folk culture. The Kachhi Ghodi Dance Rajasthan is one of the most popular Folk Dances In Rajasthan.

The Kachhi Ghodi Dance In Rajasthan India is performed on dummy horses. Men in elaborate costumes- red turbans and dhotis and kurtas ride the well decorated dummy horses. With naked swords in their hands, these dancers move rhythmically to the beating of drums and fifes while a singer narrates the exploits of the Bavaria bandits of Shekhawati. This dance is always performed by men.

Originated from the bandit regions of Shekhawati, the dance is performed for the entertainment of the bridegroom’s party. Dancers while elaborate costumes that resemble them riding on dummy horse. A vigorous dance, it uses mock fights and the brandishing of swords, nimble sidestepping and pirouetting to the music of fifes and drums. A ballad singer usually sings the exploits of the bandit Robin Hoods of Rajasthan.

Rajasthan’s kachhi Ghodi DanceThe performing arts of Rajasthan mostly hail from the tribes of Rajasthan and are reflective of the socio historical scenario peculiar to the time or race they depict. Horses have always been a very important part of warfare and transportation in Rajasthan. The legend of the valiant Rana Pratap Singh goes untold without the mention of his loyal vehicle- Chetak. Horses, as much as they were the symbol of royal power, were also used by the bandits and highwaymen who found it easy to stop people traveling on elephants of bullock carts with their horses.

Kacchi Ghodi of Rajasthan is performed by men on dummy horses. Men wear elaborate costumes embellished with brilliant mirror-work and ride the dummy horses. The dummy horses used as prop are equally adorned with meticulous embroidery and mirrored-work. The dancers ride the dummy horses with swords in their hands. These dancers with swords move to the beats of drums and fifes. In Kacchi Ghodi dance of Rajasthan, a singer narrates the tales of Bavaria bandits of Shekhawati region.

Kacchi Ghodi dance of Rajasthan is performed on the bridegroom’s party. On the ballad song, the dancers riding on fake horses uses mock fight to dramatize the scenes of the exploits of the bandit. Brandishing of swords and pirouetting to theRajasthan’s kachhi Ghodi Dance beats of drums holds the attention of viewers. Kacchi Godi of Rajasthan is a famous folk dance full of zest and colors.

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Kathputli Show-

Rajasthan Kathputli dance is world famous and well known as Puppetry dance. It is the old tradition of stories from mythology and legends are told through puppets in Rajasthan. String puppetry is very much famous in Rajasthan.

For a performance, a small stage is set where puppeteers show puppetry & narrate the story. The puppetry or Kathputli of Rajasthan is accompanied with ballads. In the performance, music or ballad plays an important role as the entire performance is based upon the ballad. Sometimes, the puppeteer makes use of various sound effects to achieve the reality impact & give a quality entertainment. The puppeteer shows all his skill to make puppets dance on his tunes. The performance of Kathputli of Rajasthan is performed during fairs and festival occasions.

Puppeteers are moving from many villages therefore, it is considered as a travelling form of entertainment. Many times, puppeteer is assisted by his family members in shifting positions of puppets on stage. Puppets are fixed on stage in fact they are strung on the stage for the performance. It recounts historic anecdotes, replay tales of love, and include much screeching and high-pitched sound as the puppet twirl and move frenetically at the time of performance.

Kathputli Elements

Kathputli word is the combination of two rajasthani language words Kath meaning wood and Putli meaning puppet. Kathputli means a puppet which is made entirely from wood covered with cotton cloth and tied with a metal wire which act as string. Being a string marionette, it is controlled by a single string that passes from the top of the puppet over the puppeteers. Puppeteer show his skill with strings like swordsmanship, dancing, horse riding, juggling and acrobatics. Animal puppets also used for the shows like camels and horses but only their necks would be movable.

Kathputli Dance Evolution

Kathputli Dance or Rajasthani puppetry art is known to be originated a thousand years ago. At that time this art was practiced by the Bhati community. After them this art also practiced by ruling families in the state and it became famous in the region. At that time these puppets were not only a source of entertainment, but also provided moral and social education. Different shows explain different problems like the dowry system, women’s empowerment, illiteracy, poverty, unemployment, and cleanliness and these shows help people to aware of the social problems that everybody was facing and also showed ways of solving them.

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Langa Party -

Rajasthan’s Langa DanceTheir entire team consists of members of the family, uncles, cousins, brothers, nephews; all men. The women were not allowed to perform traditionally and still are not. The women who are part of their team are professionals of other communities who team up with them to provide variety to the repertoire at programs. Their group has travelled abroad to perform at several programmes.

The Langas and Manganiars are groups of hereditary professional musicians, whose music has been supported by wealthy landlords and aristocrats for generations. Both sing in the same dialect, but their styles and repertoires differ, shaped by the tastes of their patrons. The monarchs of the courts of Rajput and Jaipur maintained large music and dance troupes an in an environment where the arts were allowed to flourish.

Though both communities are made up of Muslim musicians, many of their songs are in praise of Hindu deities and celebrate Hindu festivals such as Diwali and Holi. The Manganiar performers traditionally invoke the Hindu God Krishna and seek his blessings before beginning their recital. At one time, the Manganiars were musicians of the Rajput courts, accompanying their chiefs to war and providing them with entertainment before and after the battles and in the event of his death, would perform at the ruler’s vigil day and night until the mourning was over.

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